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Positive Regard Carl Rogers, a humanistic psychologist, believed that individual

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Positive Regard
Carl Rogers, a humanistic psychologist, believed that individuals must feel accepted for who they are in order to have a high level of self-worth (Farber & Doolin, 2011). Rogers coined the term “positive regard” to explain this concept of feeling accepted. Also, he believed that positive regard is essential to personal growth and self-actualization.
For this Discussion, view the “Johnson” video (Episode 3).
By Day 3
Post your descriiption of the purpose of this group. Explain the use of empowerment and strengths-based strategies. How does “positive regard” impact the group session in this video? How might you respond to Talia when she voices her skepticism of the usefulness of group sharing?
By Day 5
Respond to a colleague who has a different response to Talia. Discuss the benefits of using a strengths-based strategy in this group setting.
Shannon Beebe
RE: Discussion – Week 9
COLLAPSE
The purpose of this group is to provide support and group therapy for women who have been sexually assaulted. The intention of this group is to allow these women to connect and support one another through this trauma. It also is to provide the girls with a sense of belonging and to feel less alone knowing they are not the only ones who have gone through this and they are not to blame. According to APA, group therapy is aimed to provide a network for people who have shared experiences or a shared problem or diagnosis or interest (APA, 2019).
The use of empowerment and strengths based interventions is important in serving a client in this group setting due to the issue with confidence being lost after a sexual assault. According to Toseland and Rivas, 2017, using empowerment and strengths based interventions is an essential part of the healing process for clients. It allows them to find strengths within themselves and use coping skills and healing tactics that they are able to implement on their own. It allows them to identify positive qualities or characteristics about themselves while also helping them to realize how resilient they are for going through this traumatic event and still being here today and receiving the help and talking about it. Toseland and Rivas also state that it is important that the group leader allows group members to have their own ideas and guidance to where the group session may go. The group leader should also send group members home with skills and tools that they are able to use on their own time.
Positive regard is treating clients with warmth and compassion consistently no matter what the client shares (Farber and Dollin, 2011).
The group members and the group leaders do a good job of this after Talia talks about her sexual assault. She is in a tough battle with herself and feeling as though it was her fault due to how drunk she had gotten. The group members all back her up and assure her that she is not to blame for being assaulted and that it does not matter how much she drank, assault is assault. When Talia voices that it is painful for her to talk about this traumatic event and that she does not know how helpful it is, I would respond by validating her. I would let her know that I can understand why it is so painful to talk about. I would ask the other group members if it was ever painful for them to talk about as well, and how they coped with it. I would then allow her to take her time and share only if she is ready. If she is not ready to share in a group setting or talk about it, I would allow her to speak up when she feels ready. I would also inform her that talking about it and processing it is the first step to healing, and offer her coping skills she can use at home instead of talking. I then would check in with her one on one at the end of group and see if she is in need of one on one therapy as well.
References:
References:
Farber, B. A., & Doolin, E. M. (2011). Positive regard. Psychotherapy, 48(1), 58–64.
Toseland, R. W., & Rivas, R. F. (2017). An introduction to group work practice (8th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson, pp. 264-294.
Psychotherapy: Understanding group therapy (2019, October 31). In American Psychological Association. Retrieved from https://www.apa.org/topics/psychotherapy/group-therapy

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